Take Five

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Festival Ballet runs on…Seven Stars Bakery, of course! We’re kicking off a new series to help you get to know the FBP dancers- join us for a quick coffee break between rehearsals!

First up, we caught up with Company Dancer, Beth Mochizuki, and her sweet, silly son Stefen for a chat and and afternoon pick-me-up.

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Beth’s drink order: Hot decaf coffee
Stefan’s drink order: Apple juice
Treat of choice: Soppressata sandwich

When we last checked in with Beth, she was preparing to dance Maid Marian in Mary Ellen Beadreau’s “Robin Hood”, a role the whole family was looking forward to seeing her portray.

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“Stefen’s very excited to see the show! We checked out the picture book of Robin Hood from the library and we’ve been making our way through the story at home, so he’ll be fully prepared when he comes to the ballet.”

Born in California, Beth came to New England to study at Tufts University in Boston. While earning her Bachelor of Arts degree in American Studies, Beth managed to also begin her professional dancing career with an Apprenticeship at Festival Ballet. Talk about multitasking!

Stay tuned on our Instagram for more coffee chats with the dancers of FBP and Seven Stars Bakery!

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Announcing SDI 2018 Faculty

Our Summer Dance Intensive 2018 Senior and Junior Programs are packed with a wide range of talented, diverse faculty bringing unique perspectives and styles to this one of a kind program! We’re thrilled to announce this season’s lineup of faculty! Below, bios and headshots for each of the members of the team!

IVAYLO ALEXIEV

Senior Program
Ballet, Pas de deux, Men’s Classes

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Ivaylo Alexiev was born in Varna, Bulgaria. He started his ballet training with the Vaganova Method at the National Ballet School in Sofia. Mr. Alexiev than earned a scholarship from “UNESCO” to join the prestigious Academy of Ballet in Monte Carlo directed by Madame Marika Besobrasova where he graduated with a Diploma for a professional ballet dancer.

From 2001-2004 Ivaylo was a member of Le Ballet de L’Opera National de Bordeaux, France where he danced for three seasons participating in every production and world tours with the company. In 2004 Mr. Alexiev moved to Germany and worked with several contemporary companies. For two seasons under the direction of James Sutherland, Ivaylo was a soloist with Pforzheim Ballett where he danced in several modern productions such as- Carmen, Pink Floyd, Swan Lake and others. Mr. Alexiev took part in many Dance Galas in Europe and has been invited as a guest artist in France, Germany, Russia, Malta, Japan, USA and others. His repertory includes ballets such as Raymonda, Divertimento #15, Symphony in D, The Prodigal Son, Suite en Blanc, Sleeping Beaty, The Nutcracker, Giselle, Cinderella and others. Ivaylo has worked with some of the biggest names in European ballet including Elisabeth Platel, Charles Jude, Irek Mukhamedov, Roland Vogel, Attilo Labis, Eva Evdokimova.

Ivaylo Alexiev speaks five languages and obtained a diploma in dance pedagogy and history of ballet from L’Academie de danse classique Princesse Grace de Monte Carlo.  In 2010 Mr. Alexiev moved to US joining Jose Mateo Ballet Theatre as a principal dancer. In 2012 Ivaylo was invited to be a member of the faculty of Ballet Theatre of Boston. Part time faculty member at Boston Ballet School since 2014. North Atlantic Dance Theatre company coach since 2015. Ballet Master for Festival Ballet Providence from 2015-2017.
Faculty at Greater Boston School of Dance.

ASSAF BENCHETRIT

Senior Program
Ballet, Pas de deux, Variations

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Jenna McKerrow Wilson (as Sugar Plum Fairy) and Assaf Benchetrit (Prince) dance the Sugar Plum pas de deux from Act 2 of “The Nutcracker.”

Assaf Benchetrit began his dance and music studies at the Rubin Academy for Music and Dance in Jerusalem, Israel. Upon graduation, he danced with the Jerusalem Dance Theater, the Panov Ballet, and later with The Israeli National Ballet Company. During his military service, Assaf received the “Remarkable Dancer” prize from the Israeli government which allowed him to continue dancing while serving. After completing his military service, he arrived to United States to dance with companies such as The Joffrey, Metropolitan Classical Ballet, Alabama Ballet, and Gelsey Kirkland Ballet.

Throughout his career, Assaf toured through England, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and numerous other countries. He performed lead roles in the majority of renowned ballet productions such as Swan Lake as Siegfried, Don Quixote as Basilio, La Corsaire as Ali, La Bayadere as Solar, Coppelia as Franz, Sleeping Beauty as the Prince, the title-role in Petrushka, and a number of George Balanchine works including Apolloin the title-role, Donizetti Variations and the Nutcracker as Cavalier. Assaf holds a joint B.S in computer science and B.F.A in dance degrees with academic honors from Montclair State University, and an M.F.A degree with academic honors in dance from Hollins/ADF/Frankfurt. He was a faculty member at Columbia University (Barnard College), Rutgers University, Montclair State University, and Raritan Valley Community College, where he taught ballet, mens’ class, pas de deux, variations, and modern dance. He is currently Assistant Professor of Dance at UNH.

JENNIFER DAVIS

Senior Program
Physical Therapy

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Jennifer Davis (right) with Company Dancer Kristy DuBois

Jennifer has been practicing outpatient physical therapy on the East Side of Providence since 2004, she joined University Orthopedics at the Butler campus in the spring of 2016. A former professional ballet dancer, Jennifer specializes in Dance Injury Rehabilitation and prevention. Jennifer enjoyed 18 years of performing dance all over the United States, Europe and China before retiring as a soloist from Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre in 1996, she went on to graduate with a Bachelor of Science in Dance from Empire State College, S.U.N.Y and a Master’s of Science in Physical Therapy from The University of Rhode Island in 2001.

Jennifer developed and implemented an Injury Prevention program for the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre school and company where she worked closely with Physicians and Physical Therapists at the University of Pittsburgh Sports Medicine. Jennifer has treated the cast of “A Chorus Line” and “Hairspray” backstage at the Providence Performing Arts Center and has worked with countless student and professional dancers from local studios including Festival Ballet Providence. She has been certified in Pilates exercise training and utilizes Pilates equipment and principals in conjunction with manual therapy for physical therapy assessment and treatment. Currently Jennifer is involved in a certification program with North American Institute for Manual Orthopedic Therapy and has most recently been trained as an instructor in Pilates Suspension exercise with Pilates Academy International in New York City. She is a longtime member of International Association for Dance Medicine and Science and serves on the board of the Dance Alliance of Rhode Island. She is most proud of her daughter Olivia and loves to swim, dance and sail during her free time. In 2016 Jennifer became Festival Ballet Providence’s resident physical therapist.

KURT DOUGLAS

Senior Program
Modern (Limón)

Kurt Douglas

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Kurt Douglas joined the Boston Conservatory faculty in 2015 and is an instructor of technique, repertory, and pedagogy for modern dance. Kurt also serves as artistic director for the Boston Conservatory at Berklee’s Summer Dance Intensive.

A graduate of New York’s LaGuardia High School of Music art and the performing Arts and originally from Guyana, Douglas earned a B.F.A. in dance from Boston Conservatory and an M.F.A. in dance from Hollins University.

After graduating from the Conservatory in 2001, he joined the Limón Dance Company, where he performed in many of Limón’s most influential works. He received a 2002 Princess Grace Award and was honored by an invitation to perform for the royal family of Monaco. In 2007, Douglas became the first African American to portray Iago in The Moor’s Pavane, José Limón’s most famous work. Douglas was named one of Dance Magazine’s “Top 25 to Watch” in the January 2006 issue. He danced from 2002 to 2007 in the Radio City Christmas Spectacular and joined Ballet Hispanico from 2005 to 2006 under the direction of Tina Ramirez. In 2009 he joined the Lar Lubovitch Dance Company during their 40th anniversary season, touring throughout the United States and Asia. In 2011 he began touring with the Tony Award-winning musical “A Chorus Line” throughout the United States, Japan, Singapore, and Australia. In 2017 Kurt was invited to perform for the Boston Conservatory’s 150 anniversary gala at Symphony Hall hosted by Alan Cummings. Some guest artist credits include Aszure Barton & Artists, Prometheus Dance Company, Thang Dao Dance Company, Buglisi Dance Theatre, Dzul Dance, and the Sean Curran Dance Company.

Douglas remains invested in his teaching practices, conducting Limón Dance workshops in Boston, South Dakota, New York, Oregon,Texas, Pennsylvania, Haiti, France, England, Australia, and at prestigious institutions such as Harvard University, Southern Methodist University, the Juilliard School, SUNY Purchase, SUNY Brockport, Skidmore College, Festival Ballet Providence and Boston Conservatory. Kurt is currently a reconstructor with the Limón Foundation. In 2017 Kurt re-stage Jose Limón’s “A Choreographic Offering” for the Limón Company’s 71st Anniversary season. Douglas continues to serve as faculty with the Limón for Kids Program and the Limón Institute in New York City, the official school of the Limón Dance Foundation.

KIRSTEN EVANS

Company Dancer

Senior Program
Ballet, Variations

Evans, Kirsten

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Originally from Massachusetts, Ms. Evans began training in the FBP School at age 11. She performed as a member of FBP’s Junior Company for 5 years before joining the main company as a trainee in 2010. Ms. Evans has attended summer intensives with Bolshoi Ballet Academy, The Nutmeg Conservatory, and was a member of the Jacob’s Pillow Summer Dance Festival in 2009. Ms. Evans was a two-time finalist in the Youth American Grand Prix Ballet Competition in New York City, where she was awarded several scholarships as well as a traineeship with Ballet West in Utah. Previous roles with FBP include Wendy in Jorden Morris’ Peter Pan, the title role in Winthrop Corey’s Cinderella, Pas de Trois, Big Swans, and Cygnets in Swan Lake, Princess Tsarevna in Mihailo Djuric’s The Firebird, the roles of Sugarplum Fairy, Dew Drop Fairy, Clara, Spanish, and Marzipan in The Nutcracker, and principal in Etudes, as well as principal roles in George Balanchine’s Apollo, Allegro Brilliante, Agon, and Tchaikovsky Pas de Deux. Kirsten has also been featured in contemporary works by Viktor Plotnikov, Dominic Walsh, Ilya Kozadayev, Joseph Morrissey, and others. Kirsten works as the PR and Communications Assistant for FBP and is also pursuing a bachelor’s degree in Liberal Arts/Journalism at Providence College. This is Ms. Evans’ eighth season with the company.

LINDSAY GUARINO

Senior Program
Jazz

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Lindsay Guarino is an educator, scholar and choreographer. In her current role at Salve Regina University, she is the director of the dance program and artistic director and founder of Extensions Dance Company. A native of Buffalo, NY, Lindsay has taught master classes and choreographed in a wide range of jazz styles at colleges, dance studios and festivals across the country. Her jazz research has been presented at conferences throughout the New England region and also in Chicago, Arizona, New York, and Texas. Lindsay reaches dance educators around the globe as a professor for the National Dance Education Organization’s nationally regarded Online Professional Development Institute, where she teaches Jazz Dance Theory and Practice. Her passion for preserving and elevating jazz dance led her to publish Jazz Dance: A History of the Roots and Branches in 2014; the textbook inspired a national conference in the summer of 2016 which Lindsay planned and hosted at Salve Regina. Her greatest professional accomplishment to date is the growth of the dance program at Salve Regina University and her work with Extensions Dance Company. Lindsay holds a BFA in dance from the University at Buffalo (SUNY) and an MFA in dance from the University of Arizona.

LETICIA GUERRERO

FBP Ballet Master

Senior & Junior Programs
Ballet, Pointe, Variations

Guerrero, Leticia
Leticia Guerrero and Davide Vittorino in George Balanchine’s Allegro Brillante. © The George Balanchine Trust.

A native of Venezuela, Ms. Guerrero received her early training at the Keyla Ermecheo Ballet School in Caracas. She has performed with numerous companies including Ballet Nuevo Mundo de Caracas, Metropolitan Ballet of Caracas, Minnesota Dance Theatre, Michigan Ballet, Charleston Ballet Theatre, Jose Mateo’s Ballet Theatre and Cadence Dance Project. She has created leading roles in ballets in Gianni Dimarco’s El Amor Brujo, Schéhérazade and Azucar, Plotnikov’s Carmen, The Widow’s BroomLoof and Let Dime and Coma, De Bouteiller’s Romeo and Juliet and FBP’s 2006 premiere of Don Quixote. Other leading roles include Balanchine’s Allegro Brillante, Rubies, Tschaikovsky Pas de Deux, Tarantella, Who Cares?, Pelzig’s The Princess and the Pea, Swan Lake and Eldar Aliev’s A Thousand and One Nights. Ms. Guerrero also participated in the 2004 Venezuela Del Mundo Gala and was recognized for representing Venezuela internationally with high standards and “projection, dignity and beauty.” In addition Providence Mayor David Cicilline awarded a Citizens Citation for her “exceptional and wholehearted devotion for the art of dance.”

After her retirement from the stage in May 2012, she transitioned into her new role as Ballet Mistress with the Company, and as a faculty member with FBP School where she continues to pass on her knowledge to a new generation of dancers.

JEREMY RUTH HOWES

Senior Program
Modern (Graham)

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Jeremy Ruth is a professional dancer, choreographer and educator in the Boston area. She graduated from the University of Hartford’s Hartt School of Dance with a BFA in Dance Performance. While at Hartt she performed soloist roles in La Bayadere, Guernsey Fields, Martha Graham’s Steps in the Street and numerous other classical and contemporary works. She has danced professionally with Northern Ballet Theatre and Virginia Ballet Theatre dancing soloist roles in The Sleeping Beauty, The Nutcracker and George Balanchine’s Serenade. Currently she is a principal dancer with Anna Myer and Dancers creating roles in Myer’s original choreography. Jeremy Ruth is on faculty at Dean College teaching ballet and dance composition. She also has choreographed for the Dean College Dance Company for the past five years. She has created ten original works for the company. Jeremy Ruth teaches at Walker’s Dance in Lowell and this is her tenth year with Northeast School of Ballet. Jeremy Ruth is also currently pursuing her MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts at Goddard College.

ALEX LANTZ

Company Dancer

Senior & Junior Programs
Character, Men’s Class, Pas de Deux

Lantz Alex HS

Lantz, Alex

Alex Lantz began his dance training at age seven at the Rockford Dance Company in his home town of Rockford, Illinois and was accepted into the Royal Winnipeg Ballet School Professional Division in 2006 at age 17. Mr. Lantz joined the Royal Winnipeg Ballet company as an apprentice in 2010. He performed with the company in The Nutcracker, Swan Lake, Moulin Rouge – The Ballet, Dracula, Wonderland, The Ecstasy of Rita Joe, Svengali and Giselle. Mr. Lantz also joined the company in 2010 on a three-city tour of Israel part of the RWB’s 70th Anniversary tour. Lantz joined Festival Ballet Providence in 2012. He has performed the roles of Spanish, Snow King and Sugarplum Cavalier in The Nutcraker, has been featured in Dominic Walsh’s Afternoon of the Faun, Ilya Kozadayev’s Moonlight Pas De Deux, and has also performed leading roles in Victor Plotnikov’s Orchis and Coma as well as principal roles in George Balanchine’s Agon and Tchaikovky Pas de Deux. Mr. Lantz also has performed a number of character roles including Von Rothbart in Swan Lake, The Witch in Hansel & Gretel, Kastchai in The Firebird, Smee in Jordan Morris’ Peter Pan and Herr Drosselmeyer in The Nutcracker.

 

MARISSA MASSON

Junior Program
Jazz

 

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Marissa Masson is a New England based dancer and choreographer. As a student at Salve Regina University, she is minoring in dance and is currently a member of Extensions Dance Company, where she has had the opportunity to perform in pieces by artists such as Kat Pantos, Joe Celej, Joshua Blake Carter, John Lehrer, Rich Ashworth, Melanie George, Spencer Gavin Hering, and Kirsten Harvey.  She has performed at the American College Dance Association’s adjudicated concert in Potsdam, NY (2017) and presented her piece, “Weight of the World” in their adjudicated concert in Boston, MA (2018). This piece was also chosen to perform at the Boston Contemporary Dance Festival (2017). This summer, it will perform again at The Southern Vermont Dance Festival. Marissa has performed in other events throughout the New England region, including Urbanity Dance’s Liberty Hotel New Year’s Eve Party. She has completed intensives with Pantos Project (2014, 2016, 2017) and the National Dance Education Organization’s Jazz Dance: Roots and Branches in Practice Conference in Newport, RI (2016), where she performed and was a student host.  She has also had the honor of being the rehearsal assistant for Jessica Pearson and Melanie George. In the summer and winter of 2017, she was the business operations and company intern for Urbanity Dance in Boston. She is currently the Operations Manager Intern for Pantos Project Dance.

MARY ANN MAYER

Director, FBP School

Senior & Junior Programs
Ballet, Pointe, Variations

Mayer, Mary Ann HS

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Ms. Mayer has been affiliated with Festival Ballet Providence since 1976. As a founding member of Festival Ballet Providence, Ms. Mayer performed in many company productions while earning a BA from the University of Rhode Island. Following her performing career, she worked as stage manager for the company for several seasons before turning her focus to teaching and training young dancers. She attended several teaching programs at the National Ballet School of Canada, and in New York and Philadelphia with David Howard and Jurgen Schneider. From 1991 to 1996 she served as teacher, choreographer and Acting Director of Dance at the Performing Arts School of Worcester; returning to Festival Ballet Providence as a teacher in 1998.

In 2004, Ms. Mayer became Festival Ballet Providence’s School Director. Over the past several years the school has continued to grow under the guidance of Ms. Mayer and the artistic vision of Misha Djuric. Together they have taken the school to a place that boasts a distinguished international faculty, an outstanding young children’s program, a trainee program for the serious advanced level student, an extensive financial aid program, engaging summer programs, and an open enrollment feature that provides the community access to this art form through a variety of classes and workshops. Ms. Mayer’s students have gone on to dance with professional companies and to study at prestigious schools and universities throughout the country.

DINA MELLEY

FBP School Faculty

Junior Program
Modern

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Dina Ternullo Melley received a BFA in dance from the Boston Conservatory and received additional training from the Joffrey School in San Antonio and Gus Giordano in Chicago. Dina has performed master works by José Limón, Paul Taylor, Martha Graham and Donald McKayle and has toured and conducted workshops nationally and internationally with the Boston Liturgical Dance Ensemble. Dina has had the pleasure of both choreographing works for and performing with the Baton Rouge Ballet Theater, Of Moving Colors, the Louisiana State University College of Music and Dramatic Arts, the Arizona State University Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, Desert Dance Theatre, andUniversity of Louisiana at Lafayette’s State of LA Danse.Mrs. Melley was the choreographer for LSU Opera’s production of Gluck’s Orfeo ed Euridice and has choreographed and performed for ASU’s season-opening Gala Concert. She has also performed withBaton Rouge Ballet Theatre’s Ballet for Children, AZDance Group, and Cadence Dance Project. Dina has been on faculty at Boston College, Regis College, Louisiana State University, and University of Louisiana at Lafayette, where she was also the Artistic Director of the Dance Guild at UL Lafayette. She has also had the pleasure of working with our next generation of young dancers at numerous schools throughout the eastern, southern and southwestern United States. Mrs. Melley is excited to be living back in the Northeast with her husband and son and being apart of the Festival Ballet School faculty.

MARISSA PARMENTER

Director, Summer Dance Intensive

Senior & Junior Programs
Ballet, Pointe

Parmenter, Marissa HS

Parmenter, Marissa

Marissa Parmenter danced at Festival Ballet Providence from 2002-2006 and 2014-2017. Her most memorable FBP roles were Pingril, the witch in The Widow’s Broom, the Nurse and Lady Capulet in Romeo & Juliet, Bernarda in House of Bernarda Alba and Saskia in For Saskia. In addition to FBP, she danced for Les Grands Ballet Canadiens de Montreal, Dominic Walsh Dance Theater and BalletMet Columbus. In 2008, Ms. Parmenter was honored to participate in Paris’s prestigious L’Ete de la Danse with Les Grands Ballet. She has performed as a guest artist with many companies in the US including Aspen Santa Fe Ballet, Terpsicorps Theatre of Dance, and Boston Ballet. Ms. Parmenter has been fortunate enough to create works with leading choreographers, Ohad Naharin, James Kudelka, Mauro Bigonzetti, Edwaard Liang, Dominic Walsh and Viktor Plotnikov. She has also had the pleasure of performing works by icons such as Christopher Wheeldon, Jiri Kylian, Balanchine, Sir Frederick Ashton, Jean-Christophe Maillot, Gustavo Ramirez Sansano and Alejandro Cerrudo.

Ms. Parmenter was on faculty at BalletMet Academy and Passe Dance Center. She has been a guest teacher for Rice University, Sam Houston University, University of Houston, and Wheaton College. Ms. Parmenter has been awarded the Sono Osato and the Caroline H. Newhouse grants for dancer higher education. Her choreography has been performed at Hollins University and Wheaton College.

Ms.Parmenter received her MFA from Hollins University in collaboration with the Forsythe Company in 2014. She is an Associate Professor at Boston Conservatory at Berkeley College. She is on faculty at FBP School as well as Company Manager, Director of FBP School’s Summer Dance Intensive and Development Director.

TY PARMENTER

Company Dancer

Senior Program
Ballet, Pointe, Improv

Parmenter, Ty HS

Parmenter, Ty

Ty Parmenter returned to Festival Ballet Providence in 2014 after having been with the company from 2003-2006. His most memorable FBP roles were the Eunuch in Scherezade, Romeo in Romeo & Juliet, Faun in Afternoon of a Faun, and Principal Male in Rubies. He returned to FBP after having danced with Hubbard Street 2, Dominic Walsh Dance Theater and BalletMet Columbus. He has performed as a guest artist with many companies in the US including Aspen Santa Fe Ballet, New Choreographers Initiative, and Les Grands Ballet Canadiens. In 2006, he performed in the Mozart Sommer Festival in Wurzberg, Germany. Mr. Parmenter has been fortunate enough to create works with leading choreographers such as James Kudelka, Edwaard Liang, Dominic Walsh, Andrea Miller, Christian Spuck, Gabrielle Lamb and Viktor Plotnikov. He has also had the pleasure of performing works by Balanchine, Christopher Wheeldon, Mauro Bigonzetti, Matthew Bourne, Gustavo Ramirez Sansano and Alejandro Cerrudo.

In 2012, Mr. Parmenter was awarded the Columbus Dances Fellowship from the Greater Columbus Arts Council for his piece There is Silence. He was on faculty at Passe Dance Center and has been a guest teacher at Rice University, Sam Houston University and the University of Houston. He is currently on faculty at FBP School as well as Digital Media Coordinator. Ty has choreographed four new works on the FBP company and seven new works for the FBP school.

RUKA WHITE

Senior Program
Modern (Horton)

Ruke WhiteHS

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Ruka Hatua-Saar was born in Aviano, Italy and raised in Fort Lauderdale, FL. He received his training as a scholarship student with Miami City Ballet and was a a dancer in the training company. Upon graduating from the Dillard School of the Arts, he obtained a B.F.A and an M.F.A in Dance from Florida State University and Holllins University; respectively. He is an acclaimed national/ international dancer , having performed with companies such as: Dayton Contemporary; Philadanco; Armitage GONE!; and the Límon Dance Company. He has served as adjunct professor of dance at Wright State University; University of Dayton; Boston Conservatory; Tufts University and University of the Arts.

In the Spotlight: Danielle Davidson

Danielle Davidson, one of the area’s most respected local contemporary dancers and one-half of the groundbreaking duo “Doppelgänger Dance Collective” joins the faculty of FBP’s Summer Dance Intensive 2017, which starts next week. The four-week training program is the perfect venue for Davidson’s unique choreographic style, based in classical ballet but with a contemporary flare all her own. We asked FBP School student Mizuki Samuelson to sit down with Danielle and learn about her backstory and what inspires her choreography and teaching.

Danielle Davidson. Photo by Nikki Carrara.

Hi Danielle! To start, how did you get involved in dance?

I started dancing really late compared to most. I was 12, when I discovered dance.  My parents had me try out many sports: soccer, bowling, baseball. I hated it! And I was afraid of the ball. I would be spinning and swirling out in the field. One day, a friend at school told me about this dance class she was taking–a jazz class. I was interested so I begged my mother to sign me up. On my first day, the teacher was like “Oh you have a lot of potential. We’re gonna put you in ballet and in the performance group, tomorrow.” And I fell in love. Immediately, yeah.

So once you started taking classes, did you go straight to a professional school to train?

The training I was doing age 12 – 14, was at an amateur after-school program. It was Cecchetti ballet, jazz, modern. I went many nights a week because I was crazy about it. But I realized right away I wanted to do this professionally. So I auditioned for L’École Supérieure de Danse du Québec because I speak French and because the program offered full scholarships. I was 15 when I moved away from home and, yeah, living in an apartment with a couple other dancers…that was my teenage life.

Donizetti Variations. Image courtesy Balanchine Trust

When did you first start working with contemporary dance?

When I was about 21, 22. The transition was difficult. I didn’t know anything about floor work. [Laughs] I was so bad. Just dropping my bones into the floor. There is a professional series in Montréal programming at Circuit-Est. I basically taught myself by attending class daily for 2 or 3 years, Monday through Friday, every morning I’d show up to those classes, and mangle my way through. It’s a really elevated program and I just learned through practicing. I found that there was a lot more acceptance about your depth of physicality, not that I don’t have a lot of it, hahha, but it just felt more…honest. And human, authentic, and accepting.

What other companies did you work with?

I worked with an opera company in Hamilton, Ontario with Renaud Doucet who’s a brilliant choreographer. There were six dancers. They paid to move me to Hamilton, they paid for my apartment, it was a luxurious position. We toured all over. It was my first real commercial [job]. We were treated like royalty. It was lovely. Big change from a ballet company where you, you know, you have to kind of fend for yourself.

Photo by J. A. Dupont
Photo by J. A. Dupont

Then I moved to Toronto and worked with a company called Ballet Espressivo, mostly neoclassical ballet. Lines were still appreciated but there was less of the old romantic ballet stories and more present day conflicts. Like some of the work that Festival Ballet Providence is doing now, like Viktor Plotnikov’s work.

In my 20s, I changed companies almost every other year. I was still trying to figure out where I belonged, who I was, what made sense for me. I started to realize that the prestige mattered less than the creative process itself. I realized that, the rehearsal process, the creation of new work was more important to me than the prestige of touring or dancing with a well-known company. And actually, to be honest, touring kinda sucks. When you’re living out of a suitcase, it sounds glamorous, but it sucks. You miss your cat, your friends, grocery stores.. etc..  I was happy to stop, after all my early 20s, traveling all the time. I wanted to settle down.

I went back to Montréal in 2006. I started working with Lina Cruz, with a company called Productions Fila 13. Lina makes dance-theater, so it was this whole new experience for me. I was actually a part of the creative process. Her work tours internationally, so it’s really well supported and the company– what I loved about that job, was that the members of the company were like friends, family, people that I cared about. We were a solid team.

So do you feel like when you returned to Montreal in 2006, that was the first time you found a company that was right for you?

Yeah, it was the first time I found a company that nurtured my spirit, that felt like home, and that the work was really weird [laughs] but in a really exciting way, it made sense for my personality. I performed in this one piece where we were on all fours, licking a mirror reflection of ourselves. A small company of about six dancers– three men, three women. We were all really featured, always a soloist, you weren’t just a number. I really love that company. Dance-Theater makes so much sense to me.

As a dancer, what was the transition like to becoming a teacher and a choreographer?

Well,  right before my husband and I moved to Providence, my professional ballet school contacted me and said that they’d really love for me to come and teach. I was like [surprised look]. When I attended the orientation day it was so weird to be sitting on the side with the faculty, with people who had been my teachers. It changed everything about how I understand the dynamics between teaching and being a student. Like what it means to share your life experience and your life’s passion with people, especially younger than yourself,  who perhaps don’t quite yet know themselves.

It became a practice, every class I taught I learned more about how to share the essence behind why we do a dégagé. What does it mean that your lower half is going out into the world? You know, like the conceptual and philosophical reasons to move our bodies in space. Where the joy is and where the pain is. All that stuff helped me better understand why I dance.

When they asked me if I would set a piece on the dancers, I thought , Wow. I mean I don’t know. Do you really think I’m capable?.. It was that they believed in me, when I didn’t believe in myself. They trusted that I could do it, so I had to prove to myself and them that I could. It seemed that I had a gift for choreography.

I always thought I was a dancer. And I can see that in my future, I’m going to be more of a choreographer. I’m already headed down that path. But for right now it’s important that I dance, that I teach and that I choreograph because all three, they communicate with each other. My dance experience teaches me about teaching. And the teaching teaches me about choreography. And the choreography teaches me—they all speak to one another in this really cohesive way that reminds me how everything is connected. In the universe. We’re all connected. And it’s just a beautiful, spiritual experience to have, to have so many outlets to come together. I’m sorry, is this really esoteric? [Laughs]

How would you describe your choreography? What is your process like?

Well, it’s all over the place. I’ve made some pieces that are very movement vocabulary-based, that are almost like feats of technique and virtuosity. I’ve also made quiet works that are sparse and take their time in horizontal space. But the vocabulary itself is somewhere between contemporary release technique and neoclassical ballet. I’ll give my dancers a conceptual task and they will generate some material that I will then completely take apart [laughs] and re-frame, but there is still an essence of them left. I’ll give little hints about what I want their performative state to be, but I hope for them to want and to find the journey within the piece for themselves. As for conceptually what types of work I make… A lot of it is about identity, transformation, struggle, community, definitely community, anonymity. All the works I’ve done have in some way been about those concepts.

What’s it like to be a female choreographer in the male-dominated field?

I find that in order to not let that fact of life get me down, I use the knowledge of this inequality to empower me. That we as a society have men still being paid more than women in all jobs, that men are still being valued as more successful…. it’s a travesty. But, instead of seeing it like I’m a victim and I’m defeated by being a woman, I see it as a challenge for myself to be the best that I can be. Regardless of how society or the systems that are in place right now are set up, I feel it is my duty to continue striving to do my absolute best and to share that with the world in the best way that I can. I see that horrible inequality as an opportunity for me to grow, to speak my truth and to fight the systems in place.

Shura Baryshnikov and Danielle Davidson. Promotional photos for Myths, Legends & Questions. Photo by Nikki Carrara.

Do you think being a woman has any influence on your own choreography?

Absolutely. I’m very interested in the ideologies of third wave feminism, and for example, the writings of Judith Butler. I think what’s important to me is equality, and justice, and the attempt to get as close to it as possible, in every climate and environment. Whether you’re a transgender individual or a straight white female, how you identify is what matters I think, that as humans we navigate life trying to remain true to ourselves and foster relationships of equality with everyone we encounter.. that’s what is important to me. So, I would say because I do identify as a woman, it’s glorious to know who I am and to be able to remain true to that. I wish that for everyone..That’s going to be a concept explored in our piece at Festival, definitely. (Editor’s Note: This new commissioned choreography for FBP’s Summer Dance Intensive will be performed at WaterFire on July 22 and at the FBP Black Box Theatre on July 29). 

Photo by Marc Pilaro

So would you say that your experience in theater informs your work as well?

Yeah, absolutely. The other thing is I’m an entrepreneur. Shura and I co-founded a company! And this is the magical transition that happened when I moved to Providence. When I was living in Montréal my husband was doing his B.A. When it was time to do his M.A. he said he wanted to transfer to a better known university. But I wanted to stay in Montréal. I loved the company I was working with, and I was happy. So he stayed for me, he stayed in Montréal for a few more years. But then he wanted to get his Ph.D. at an Ivy League university, so we moved to Providence.

I found a company in Massachusetts called Prometheus and I work with them. I just got lucky, finding a home, a family, a group of dancers that allow me to be part of the creative process, build the vocabulary, and work with guest choreographers. At the time, I didn’t feel that there was the type of dancing I wanted to do consistently here in Providence.

Then I met Shura Baryshnikov in a technique class and we just sensed the ‘doppelgänger-ness’ immediately. We sought out our dream choreographers, began fundraising, built Doppelgänger Dance Collective  (DDC) from the ground up and it has been really successful! So, all this to say, I initially moved here thinking that my dance career was over, that I would be gardening and crying into my flowers, but then, this new opportunity came, to be an entrepreneur, to be a woman building a company. We’re doing really well and I would have never ever thought of co-founding or directing a dance company. I would have never wanted to do the administration and the websites and the learning about technical direction and production design and dealing with presenters and the media. All of that stuff, it was never something I wanted, but I’m loving it. I’m learning so much about this other side of dance- arts-administration, things that I would have never learned as just a member of a company. So, Providence, in that respect, has given me this thing that I would have never imagined for myself. A real gift in learning.

I was just going to ask about your company with Shura! So what would you say is the idea behind Doppelgänger Dance Collective?

 The day Shura and I met, we just intuitively felt and knew that we’d met our match. Physically, emotionally, spiritually, mentally, we were at the same place. We were at the same age, we had a ton of different experiences and wisdom to bring to the table, but we were mirror reflections. We wanted to push ourselves and each other past our own limitations, breaking all boundaries and just being recklessly brave about what was possible for the arts community and for ourselves in Providence. We also wanted to foster the creation and performance of live music for our concerts, and give choreographers the opportunity to have their works presented, without having to self-produce. In a sense we are also curators. We’re doing it all. It’s crazy. I mean we have some help, we have a team of people who help us: a lovely intern, an amazing social media strategist, a technical director, etc..  but yeah… it’s crazy.

What are some of your favorite pieces that you’ve worked on? Either your own choreography or things that you’ve danced.

I was a soloist in a piece choreographed by Thierry Malandain, the artistic director of Ballet Biarritz. He created a work for us called Gnossiènes, set to Erik Satie’s beautiful ‘Gymnopédies & Gnossiennes’ . I danced a trio with two men where I had to do this crazy acrobatic stuff. I was at once, a rabbit coming out of a magician’s hat, and also some sort of gymnast; I had to literally flip off the barre, I had to maneuver my hands on the barre as the guys swirled me around like a helicopter. The barre itself had on, one side the light and, on the other, the dark. I had to repeatedly try to get into the light because I was in the dark. It reflected the state of being or frame of mind, I was in at the time, and it just meant so much to me, emotionally, spiritually, physically… We performed that piece all over Europe, all over North America, that piece I have never stopped loving.

Davidson in Gnossiènes. Image courtesy Thierry Malandain, Ballet Biarritz.

Danielle Davidson will teach a master class and choreographic workshop July 8-9 at Festival Ballet Providence. Click here to learn more.

Interview conducted by FBP School student Mizuki Samuelson. In the Spotlight series edited by Kirsten Evans and Dylan Giles.

FBP School student Mizuki Samuelson

Facilitating the Future

FBP Company in rehearsal in Studio 2. Photo by Kirsten Evans.

On a given day, the Festival Ballet Providence studios would echo with sounds of music and dancing as rehearsals and classes unfold throughout the day. But recently, the sounds of power tools pierce through an eerie silence, as contractors replace old flooring and install new equipment and fixtures while the FBP company and school are mostly on break.

It’s all part of a multi-year renovation project that we are embarking on, to enhance the experience of our Black Box Theatre patrons, FBP School students, and company artists.

Goals for Phase I of the plan (September 2017 completion) include:

  • Black Box Theater lighting system overhaul
  • Audio system upgrade
  • State-of-the-art projection system for multi-media projects
  • Repairs to main corridor and theater entrance
  • Cosmetic and structural improvements to exterior
  • Replacement of dance floor in Studio 2

Subsequent phases are still in the planning process and will include even more expansive improvements to the building and infrastructure.

The Phase I renovations total $120,000 and about half of that is being subsidized by a Cultural Facilities matching grant from the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts (RISCA) which allocates funds specifically for these renovation purposes. The funds originate from a 2014 Creative and Cultural Economy bond referendum, approved by Rhode Island voters. The bond focuses on the preservation of historical sites as well as the improvement and renovation of nonprofit artistic and performance centers throughout the state.

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But the grant requires 1:1 matching by the recipient organization, meaning we need the help of our audience and supporters to get us to our goal. Now through June 30, the first $59,552 in donations made to the “Cultural Facilities” capital campaign will be matched dollar-for-dollar.

The FBP studios and Black Box Theatre serve as a destination for artists and arts enthusiasts. This ambitious new undertaking will ensure its future as an artistic landmark for generations to come.

Click here to make a contribution to the Cultural Facilities Capital Campaign.

Books for the Ballet

This weekend, FBP School will be holding a special fundraiser at Barnes & Noble in Warwick. Funds raised will go toward the Christine Hennessey Scholarship Fund, a need-based tuition assistance program for the FBP School. The fundraiser runs 10:00am-7:00pm on Sunday May 7, 2017 and continues online through May 11, 2017; you must mention the fundraiser at checkout.

Click Here for the PDF Flyer | Click here for Online Shopping instructions

We asked company dancers and FBP School faculty to give us some recommendations, for aspiring dancers and lovers of dance.

We encourage you to stop by on Sunday, or shop online next week. It’s also the perfect time to get your Mother’s Day gifts!

Alan Alberto, Company Dancer

Basic Principles of Classical Ballet
By Agrippina Vaganova

This is a book that I purchased years ago, when I started ballet, as a reference to proper technique. I hope this is helpful and inspires.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/basic-principles-of-classical-ballet-agrippina-vaganova/1018887376?ean=9780486220369

 

Valerie Cookson-Botto,  Educational Outreach Coordinator

Life in Motion: An Unlikely Ballerina Young Readers Edition
By Misty Copeland

A great biography for young dancers. Recommend for grades 5-9.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/life-in-motion-misty-copeland/1123673642?ean=9781481479790

 

 

Technical Manual and Dictionary of Classical Ballet
By Gail Grant

My go to dictionary for classical ballet technique. 

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/technical-manual-and-dictionary-of-classical-ballet-gail-grant/1100927644?ean=9780486218434

 

 

 

Honk!: The Story of a Prima Swanerina
by Pamela Duncan Edwards, Henry Cole (Illustrator)

A perfect story for preK-3 dancers.  This story has become a beloved part of our outreach program.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/honk-pamela-duncan-edwards/1111741943?ean=9780786812981

Cinderella
by Sarah L. Thomson, Nicoletta Ceccoli (Illustrator), Charles Perrault (Text by)

A beautiful telling of the classic fairytale with the opulence of the high courts of France.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/cinderella-sarah-l-thomson/1107756321?ean=9780761461708

 

 

Swan Lake (Vienna State Opera Ballet) DVD
Director: Truck Branss Cast: Rudolf Nureyev, Margot Fonteyn, Natalya Makarova

Watching any and all of the grand ballets performed by the great dancers of all time is always inspiring and educational.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/dvd-swan-lake-rudolf-nureyev/3627393?ean=0044007340448

 

Boyko Dossev, Company Dancer

Man of La Mancha

This is one is one of my all-time favorites. It inspired me when I was a kid, we had it on one of those old music discs, I grew up with it and I am who I am in part thanks to this.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/man-of-la-mancha/8846608?ean=0886919485622

Kirsten Evans, Company Dancer, SDI 2017 Faculty

The Widow’s Broom
By Chris Van Allsburg

Anything by Chris Van Allsburg (obvs), but I’ll definitely be pulling out my copy of The Widow’s Broom soon…

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/widows-broom-chris-van-allsburg/1101707141?ean=9780395640517

 

 

 

Peter and Wendy: Peter Pan, the Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up
By J. M. Barrie

Peter Pan has always been one of my favorites, and now it hold a special place on my bookshelf 😉

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/peter-and-wendy-j-m-barrie/1117501921?ean=9781468149821

 

 

Dylan Giles, Company Dancer, Marketing Director

Writing in the Dark, Dancing in the New Yorker
By Arlene Croce

Arlene Croce is arguably the single best writer on dance in the 20th Century. Her insights were at once poignant and arresting, training a penetrating eye unlike any other on a rapidly changing art form.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/writing-in-the-dark-dancing-in-the-new-yorker-arlene-croce/1102895077?ean=9780813029139

 

Balanchine Variations
By Nancy Goldner

This is a great book about choreographic icon George Balanchine. It’s a biography of sorts, told through the lens of his works, from the earliest surviving work Apollo (his eighty fourth piece of choreography!) to the blockbuster Jewels and the jaw dropping Ballo Della Regina. A concise encapsulation of a prolific choreographer.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/balanchine-variations-nancy-goldner/1101627527?ean=9780813032269

 Debbi Leahy, FBP School Faculty

Jazz Dance: A History of the Roots and Branches
By Lindsay Guarino (Editor), Wendy Oliver (Editor)

“A must-read for all dancers as the invaluable historical references and in-depth coverage of the different jazz forms cannot be found in such detail in any other book on the market today.”

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/jazz-dance-lindsay-guarino/1115445880?ean=9780813061290

 

 

An Evening with the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater (DVD)

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater performs some of the works that have won them wide acclaim, including “Divining” and “The Stack-Up.” Music is provided by many artists, including Laura Nyro and Alice Coltrane.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/dvd-an-evening-with-the-alvin-ailey-american-dance-theater-thomas-grimm/3875015?ean=0807280045390

 

Ailey Ascending: A Portrait in Motion
By Alvin Alley America Dance Theater, Andrew Eccles (Photographer), Anna Deavere Smith (Foreword by), Judith Jamison (Preface by)

In celebration of the 50th anniversary of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, this dazzling book includes both original black and white and full-color photographs by Andrew Eccles.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/ailey-ascending-alvin-alley-america-dance-theater/1120080542?ean=9780811864800

Revelations: The Autobiography of Alvin Ailey
by Alvin Ailey, A. Peter Bailey

This stunning autobiography relates the powerful story of one man’s painful search for identity despite a lifetime of remarkable achievement.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/revelations-alvin-ailey/1112961209?ean=9780806518619

Marissa Parmenter, Company Dancer, SDI Director, Interim Development Director

Dancing in the Wings
By Debbie Allen, Kadir Nelson (Illustrator)

Sassy worries that her too-large feet, too-long legs, and even her big mouth will keep her from her dream of becoming a star ballerina. So for now she’s just dancing in the wings, watching from behind the curtain, and hoping that one day it will be her turn to shimmer in the spotlight.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/dancing-in-the-wings-debbie-allen/1100734286?ean=9780142501412

The True Memoirs of Little K: A Novel
By Adrienne Sharp

Exiled in Paris, the frail, elderly Mathilde Kschessinska sits down to write her memoirs. A lifetime ago, she was the vain, ambitious, impossibly charming prima ballerina assoluta of the tsar’s Russian Imperial Ballet in St. Petersburg.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/true-memoirs-of-little-k-adreinne-sharp/1100247224?ean=9780312610715

 

Taking Flight: From War Orphan to Star Ballerina
By Michaela DePrince, Elaine Deprince

The extraordinary memoir of an orphan who danced her way from war-torn Sierra Leone to ballet stardom, most recently appearing in Beyonce’s Lemonade and as a principal in a major American dance company.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/taking-flight-michaela-deprince/1118138587?ean=9780385755146

 

The Black Dancing Body: A Geography From Coon to Cool
By B. Gottschild

What is the essence of black dance in America? To answer that question, Brenda Dixon Gottschild maps an unorthodox ‘geography’, the geography of the black dancing body, to show the central place black dance has in American culture.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-black-dancing-body-b-gottschild/1123546314?ean=9781403971210

Ty Parmenter, Company Dancer, FBP School Faculty

A Choreographer’s Handbook
By Jonathan Burrows

A Choreographer’s Handbook invites the reader to investigate how and why to make a dance performance.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/choreographers-handbook-jonathan-burrows/1100516695?ean=9780415555302

 

 

Brontorina

by James Howe, Randy Cecil (Illustrator)

My son Miles is always so happy when she gets her shoes.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/brontorina-james-howe/1100832769?ean=9780763653231

 

Gwynn Root, Company Apprentice

The Saturdays
By Elizabeth Enright

This series was one of my favorites… I identified with the younger sister Randy, who was a tomboy and clumsy, and wanted to be a ballet dancer.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/saturdays-elizabeth-enright/1102326775?ean=9780312375980

 

 

Eugenia Zinovieva, Company Dancer

Illustrated Ballet Stories
By DK Publishing, Introduction by Darcey Bussell (former Royal Ballet principal)

I loved this book when I was a kid.

 

 

 

 

 

In the Community: Free Cinderella Workshops

Before she gets to the ball, Cinderella will be coming to a library or bookstore near you!

We’ve got a fantastic lineup of workshops from Wakefield to Providence, all of them completely free and open to the public. Each workshop will include a reading of a Cinderella storybook, an interactive group dance, and a small craft that children can take home to remember the magical event. We hope to see you there!

Outreach Coordinator Valerie Cookson-Botto (center) with FBP Trainees Katherine Bickford (left) and Olivia Kaczmarzyk.

Cinderella Community Workshops

Special thanks to our outreach team led by Valerie Cookson-Botto and to the libraries and bookstores for helping make these workshops possible. Don’t forget to get your tickets for Cinderella, May 12-14, 2017 at The Vets!

Announcing Summer Dance Intensive Faculty

We are thrilled to announce our Summer Dance Intensive (SDI) Faculty for the 2017 Senior and Junior Sessions! We’ve got a great group of familiar and new faces for these great programs, which run July 3-29 (Senior) and July 31-Aug. 11 (Junior). Click here to learn more about the programs.

Ivaylo Alexiev

Ballet
Festival Ballet Providence
http://festivalballetprovidence.org/IvayloAlexiev.php

Assaf Benchetrit

Ballet
University of New Hampshire
http://cola.unh.edu/faculty-member/assaf-benchetrit

Danielle Davidson

Ballet, Modern
Doppelganger Dance Collective
Boston Conservatory
https://www.danielledavidson.net

Kirsten Evans

Ballet
Festival Ballet Providence
http://festivalballetprovidence.org/kirstenevans.php

Leticia Guerrero

Ballet
Festival Ballet Providence
http://festivalballetprovidence.org/leticiaGuerrero.php

Adrienne Hawkins

Jazz
Impulse Dance Company
http://www.dancecomplex.org/Dance_Complex_Faculty.htm

Jeremy Ruth Howes

Modern, Ballet
Northeast School of Ballet
http://www.northeastyouthballet.org/history/directors/jeremy-revilock-frost-ballet/

John Lam

Ballet
Boston Ballet
http://johndlam.com/john-lam/

Alex Lantz

Ballet, Character
Festival Ballet Providence
http://festivalballetprovidence.org/alexlantz.php

 

Mary Ann Mayer

Ballet
Festival Ballet Providence
http://festivalballetprovidence.org/school/CDEdirector.php

Marissa Parmenter

SDI Director, Ballet
Festival Ballet Providence
http://festivalballetprovidence.org/marissaparmenter.php

Ty Parmenter

Ballet
Festival Ballet Providence
http://festivalballetprovidence.org/typarmenter.php

Dionysia Williams

Jazz
BalletMet
https://www.balletmet.org/academy/faculty-staff/dionysia-williams/

 

Behind The Scenes: Boyko Dossev’s The Little Prince

Boyko Dossev is a man of many talents. You may have seen him on stage as Romeo in Romeo & Juliet last February. This time he’s taking on the role of choreographer, one he has had a few times previously creating charming ballets like Mother Goose Goes to Hollywood, and Little Red Riding Hood. We sat down with Boyko to get all the inside scoop on his newest creation for FBP’s chatterBOXtheatre series, The Little Prince.

Hello Mr. Choreographer! The story of The Little Prince is special to many people. What was it that drew you personally to this story?

I’ve always wanted to choreograph a ballet based on Saint Exupéry’s The Little Prince. This is one of those stories that carry wisdom in just a few pages. It continues to inspire children and adults all over the world. It is symbolic, sad, poetic and at the same time full of hope. The Little Prince reminds us what is truly important in times of great challenge. The journey of The Little Prince is one that we all are having and I wanted through my interpretation of the book, once again, to remind adults about the kids they once were and to help kids to never forget what it’s like to be a child.

That’s beautiful- but also complex. What are some of the challenges in telling this story? What are some of the rewarding aspects?

The main challenge when you are telling a story like this through choreography is translating the incredible words of wisdom and then communicating these messages without compromising their meaning and integrity. It is challenging to create a ballet that can convey Exupéry’s main idea through movement, while also allowing children and adults have a wonderful time. This is the main challenge, to communicate the spirit of the book successfully in less than 35 minutes.

That is a daunting task! But we are so lucky to have incredible music to help us tell the story. Can you tell us a bit about where the music for this ballet came from?

I am very lucky to have a very dear friend, Geneviève Leclair, who connected me with the French-Canadian composer Maxime Goulet. His music is perfect for this project and although it was not written especially for The Little Prince, every single note seems to be as if we have collaborated for years to create the perfect score for my choreography. Maxime is remarkably talented composer and I feel extremely honored and grateful that he agreed to work with me on this ballet.

Maxime Goulet with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra

Do you have any favorite aspects of the ballet so far?

My all-time favorite part will always be the process of creation and collaboration with the dancers. I wish we could have more time in the studios to explore and see where and how far we can take the story of The Little Prince.

I love that. As you mentioned earlier, this story has been around for quite some time. Can you tell us a bit about what makes your interpretation of The Little Prince unique?

I think what makes this interpretation of The Little Prince special is the way dancers tell Exupéry’s story through their own sensitivity and experiences. I can create the steps and different effects to try to tell the story, but is the dancers who bring their characters to life and make them real. This is what will tell the story in a unique and exciting way.

FBP dancer Kailee Felix (aloft) with ballet master Mindaugas Bauzys and dancer Jordan Nelson in rehearsal for Boyko Dossev’s The Little Prince.

Another interesting thing about this version of The Little Prince is that you’ve decided to use multimedia in the show, including video and audio collaboration. Can you tell us a bit about that?

Everything started with one of the company dancers, Jacob Hoover, creating an origami elephant out of scrap paper during in his free time during a break at the studio. In fact, he created few of them and this inspired me very much. I envisioned how we could create an animation, like when I was a kid, without the help of all the Hollywood type of technology. I wanted it to be very basic but at the same time captivating to the imagination.

I asked Jacob to create a bigger elephant, a snake, a rose, a fox…I wanted them all. At this time of the development process, I asked another company dancer, Ty Parmenter, to come on board and help us film. I wanted to have a stop-motion video of the paper elephant and a boa constrictor swallowing the elephant to represent the beginning of the story. To my surprise, both Ty and Jacob didn’t think I was crazy and agreed to work with me!

Behind the scenes look at creating a new stop-motion animation for The Little Prince, directed by Ty Parmenter with figures by Jacob Hoover

Thanks to company dancer Eugenia Zinoveva’s boyfriend, Jon Gourlay’s help we were able to get a green screen and start to experiment. All of this led to the idea to have Jacob’s mother, Michele Gutlove, (also a phenomenal glass artist) create some sketches of The Little Prince and integrate them into the media. She made some fantastic images, her work as an artist is so inspiring.

Behind the scenes look at the creation of a timelapse video showing artist Michele Gutlove’s watercolor artwork for The Little Prince.

Here is a gallery of some of Michele’s watercolors:

But we didn’t stop there…

My colleague and good friend Viktor Plotnikov, whose Carmen is opening the same weekend as The Little Prince, helped me with the sets, which became an integral part of the entire multimedia project. At the end, we recorded some narration as well, done by Ms. Valerie Tutson. Ms. Tutson’s voice and artistry added another dimension and sensitivity to the ballet.

Finally, Misha called up Barnaby Evans, creator of Providence’s acclaimed WaterFire installation. His iconic star lanterns were the perfect “cherry on top” of the vibrant scenery and imagery.

FBP dancers sporting luminescent star lanterns courtesy of WaterFire Providence

Wow, so it was a collaborative effort! The dancers, staff, and community at FBP are so multi-talented.

I feel very fortunate to have all these recourses available to create The Little Prince. Misha’s support, guidance, and trust in every step I made were essential. I feel very lucky to collaborate with all these amazing artists and dancers. I am very excited to see all of the elements of The Little Prince come together. A story as complex as The Little Prince is hard to interpret in the theater. I needed to do something that would help me tell the story right, something that would add to the choreography in a way that could transmit to our youngest audience the beauty, the wisdom, and the sensitivity of Antoine de Saint-Exupery’s The Little Prince.

Thank you so much, Boyko!

The Little Prince concludes next weekend, but it’s almost completely sold out. Call 401-353-1129 to be added to a stand-by waiting list.